The development of novel antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics is advantaged by the fact that these medicines can target a specific gene to regulate the amount of the target gene by either turning up or turning down gene expression as desired for clinical benefit. Many of these targets are considered ‘undrugable’ by other more conventional therapeutics.

We have developed a range of innovative technologies that enhance the systemic delivery of antisense oligonucleotide gene medicine. The first pipeline technology is being developed to delivery an antisense oligonucleotide based upon a RNA analogue backbone chemistry (phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides), particularly to target tissues, including the heart, that are currently refractory to cargo delivery.

IP

Sutura Therapeutics development programs are underpinned by a mix of patents, know-how and agreements which seek to protect the key aspects of the platform, and the products they are developing.

This platform looks to improve the delivery of biologically active compounds using cell penetrating agents. The current focus utilises stapled or stitched peptides to provide improved delivery of particularly, though not exclusively, anti-sense oligonucleotides, with their lead product targeting dystrophin and Duchene’s muscular dystrophy.

The technology and underlying IP however covers the targeting of both exogenous and endogenous genes, and data generated suggest improved bioavailability, reduced toxicity and an ability to get the biologically active compound into tissues that may have proved refractory to the biologically active compound per se.

This platform looks to improve the delivery of biologically active compounds using cell penetrating agents. The current focus utilises stapled or stitched peptides to provide improved delivery of particularly, though not exclusively, anti-sense oligonucleotides, with their lead product targeting dystrophin and Duchene’s muscular dystrophy.

The technology and underlying IP however covers the targeting of both exogenous and endogenous genes, and data generated suggest improved bioavailability, reduced toxicity and an ability to get the biologically active compound into tissues that may have proved refractory to the biologically active compound per se.

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